MIDEA Posts by Peter Samis

iPad apps, Part 3: Pleasures of the Kin-Aesthetic, Sculptural and Journalistic

iPad apps, Part 3: Pleasures of the Kin-Aesthetic, Sculptural and Journalistic

Isn’t it amazing how what takes 15 minutes to present in a MacWorld talk takes three–or even four–blog posts to write?  Now what’s that about? On the one hand, the speed of speech vs. the slowness of text, and on the other, the speed with which one can navigate an app in a demo versus […]

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iPad apps, Part 2: Pleasures and Pains of the Kin-Aesthetic

iPad apps, Part 2: Pleasures and Pains of the Kin-Aesthetic

In my last post, I suggested that the promise of the iPad was that: by engaging us physically with a magic pane of glass that refreshes and surprises us through a succession of media, we’d become enchanted with the topics at hand (literally, at our fingertips) where curiosity leads, knowledge may follow While games are interactive, […]

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iPad apps, Conclusion: A List of Qualities

In my first three posts about art and museum reference apps, I spoke of: the plethora of shovel- and brochureware apps that don’t make full use of the iPad’s kin-aesthetic qualities, while games such as Tate’s, which demand physical responsiveness, do; the delight of a beautifully designed interface such as MoMA’s AbEx NY: it invites […]

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iPad apps, Part 1: Pleasures and Pains of the Kin-Aesthetic

iPad apps, Part 1: Pleasures and Pains of the Kin-Aesthetic

I just spoke at MacWorld on a panel called “The World’s Biggest Art Museum,” and it gave me the opportunity to review the latest crop of art viewing and museum-based iPad apps. There are certainly a lot out there. Many are shovelware: notably, the plethora of inexpensive apps published by a company that goes by […]

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Museums in the Waves of Digital Flux

Museums in the Waves of Digital Flux

“A year and a half is like a full technology cycle… and obsolescence has taken a real speed boost, too.” –SFMOMA IT Director Leo Ballate At the NMC Summer Conference in Anaheim last month, John Seely Brown delivered a rousing closing keynote called “The New Culture of Learning in a World of Constant Flux.” JSB […]

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Art and Its Audience: Taking It to the Street

Art and Its Audience: Taking It to the Street

To follow up on Visual Velcro and visitors’ gut-level responses to artworks: one important determinant—though by no means the only one—is the artists’ own consideration of their audience. Are they making art as a way of communicating with others, or are they solely interested in their own private investigations?  There is no cut and dry […]

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Visual Velcro: Hooking Our Visitors Where They Are*

Visual Velcro: Hooking Our Visitors Where They Are*

When do people most want information regarding the artworks in an exhibition? Some—more and more, in fact—want information in advance of their visit to the galleries, via the Web, and a smaller number will take the time to return to the museum’s website after their visit to learn more. But the vast majority of visitors […]

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Of Non-Linear Delight, Opacity and Revelation

Of Non-Linear Delight, Opacity and Revelation

I have recently finished reading the early English novel—if we dare call it that—Tristram Shandy. Anyone who recalls the early days of multimedia and the Web will remember the exhilaration of being present at the creation of a new medium/art form, before the rules were invented. That’s what Shandy was back in the early 1760s, […]

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What made ‘New Media’ new

What made ‘New Media’ new

For me, the first “Aha!” experience/breakthrough in digital media was the synchronized merging of sound and light, in the form of text on a black-and-white screen synched to a CD-ROM— something a book could not do. Others have told me they had similar “aha!” insights with laser disc players. All were made possible by Hypercard, […]

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